Nowadays, parents know how much of a challenge it can be to pull children away from their smartphones. Whether they are playing a game, browsing social media or texting with friends, it seems that children are attached to their cellphones.

According to recent studies, children spend roughly four to seven hours a day on their phone, depending on their age. Many parents are trying to reduce that time as much as possible. However, a new study found that there might be one positive outcome of how much time children use their phones – particularly after a divorce.

Texting helps maintain the parent-child relationship

Recently, researchers found that texting with children or communicating with them through social media can make a divorce easier on kids. It allows them to sustain regular contact with both parents, even when the child stays with the other parent.

This consistent contact with parents helped to prevent:

  • Feelings of disconnection when the child transitions between households;
  • The parent’s relationship from impacting the child’s relationship with each parent; and
  • Kids from feeling like they were in the middle of their parents and must choose sides.

The ability to contact children directly helped children to feel that both parents truly were a part of their everyday lives.

Parents should still make sure they agree about communication

However, California parents should keep in mind that this kind of contact could cause controversy – depending on the other parent’s view.

Some parents might be uncomfortable with the other parent talking to the children during their parenting time. On the other hand, some might try to interfere with the other parent’s parenting time by constantly calling or communicating with children as a power play.

Therefore, it might be helpful for parents to address this type of communication together and reach an agreement they both agree on. Parents have the right to contact their children, however establishing an agreement that works for the whole family can help avoid conflict in the future, while still promoting the child’s relationship with both parents.